Book of the Week: Stanley Spencer: Art as a Mirror of Himself by Andrew Causey

Stanley Spencer’s paintings aren’t always easy to like, but they are hard to ignore. As the sub-title of Andrew Causey’s new book (my Book of the Week) implies, Spencer’s paintings don’t set out to please, but rather to reflect the artist’s own singular internal vision. ‘Stanley Spencer explored fundamental issues of life with an urgency and persistence unique among British artists […]

Lund Humphries Landmarks – Paul Nash: paintings, drawings and illustrations, edited by Margot Eates, with essays by Herbert Read, John Rothenstein, E.H. Ramsden and Philip James (1948)

Andrew Causey describes Paul Nash’s extensive involvement in preparing the book on his work which was in the end published posthumously by Lund Humphries in 1948. Paul Nash had been preparing for at least two years before his death in 1946 material for the book which Lund Humphries would publish in due course.  He collected black-and-white prints […]

Book of the Week: W. Barns-Graham: A Studio Life by Lynne Green

For many artists who live into their eighties and nineties, retirement isn’t an option. Unless the frailties of old age curtail it, the creative impulse continues, nourished perhaps by a sense of being free of external expectations and demands, and directed by years of experience. Painter and printmaker Wilhelmina Barns-Graham was born in Edinburgh in […]

Lund Humphries Landmarks – Henry Moore Sculpture and Drawings, with an Introduction by Herbert Read (1944)

Former Head of Collections and Exhibitions at The Henry Moore Foundation, David Mitchinson, describes the importance of the comprehensive book on Henry Moore’s work which was published by Lund Humphries in 1944. The triumvirate of sculptor Henry Moore, art historian Herbert Read and printer/publisher Peter Gregory was one based on friendship, Yorkshire, and mutual respect. Read had […]

The Outsider as Witness: Displaced Visions by Nissan Perez and Grim Glory by Ernestine Carter

In his Lund Humphries Landmark post on Ernestine Carter’s Grim Glory (1941), Antony Penrose describes the efforts of his mother, Lee Miller, and a number of other prominent photographers to raise US consciousness about the hardships and the horrors of the London Blitz. Miller, he explains, had come to the UK from New York in 1939, having begun […]

Lund Humphries Landmarks: Grim Glory – Pictures of Britain Under Fire edited by Ernestine Carter (1941)

Antony Penrose explains the fascinating story behind the book which revealed the realities of London’s Blitz to the American public. By the time the full ferocity of the Blitz began on September 7 1940 Lee Miller, formerly a fashion model turned Surrealist photographer in Paris and collaborator of Man Ray, had been working freelance for Vogue for […]

Book of the Week: Whitechapel at War: Isaac Rosenberg and his Circle

‘Art is not a plaything’, wrote painter-poet Isaac Rosenberg in 1912. He was by all accounts a serious, sensitive young man. When Rosenberg was first introduced in 1911 to the group of East End writers and artists known as the ‘Whitechapel Boys’, aspiring writer Joseph Leftwich described him as ‘depressingly self-absorbed … he did not smile once all that first […]